S.Paulo etc.

  1. steepravine:

Raging Marin River
(Mount Tamalpais, California - 2/2014)

    steepravine:

    Raging Marin River

    (Mount Tamalpais, California - 2/2014)

  2. 
Writing advice from James Merrill: “You hardly ever need to state your feelings. The point is to feel and keep the eyes open. Then what you feel is expressed, is mimed back at you by the scene. A room, a landscape.”
Pictured: Anthony Hecht (far left), James Merrill, Richard Wilbur and others travel to the Fiftieth Anniversary celebration of the Academy of American Poets at the Library of Congress.

theparisreview

    Writing advice from James Merrill: “You hardly ever need to state your feelings. The point is to feel and keep the eyes open. Then what you feel is expressed, is mimed back at you by the scene. A room, a landscape.”

    Pictured: Anthony Hecht (far left), James Merrill, Richard Wilbur and others travel to the Fiftieth Anniversary celebration of the Academy of American Poets at the Library of Congress.

    theparisreview

  3. Rua Augusta, São Paulo, 1970.
via amarelolaranjamadrugada.

    Rua Augusta, São Paulo, 1970.

    via amarelolaranjamadrugada.

  4. lastnightsreading:

Edmund White at 192 Books, 3/4/14

    lastnightsreading:

    Edmund White at 192 Books, 3/4/14

  5. timeshaiku:

A haiku from the article: With Banking, What Happens in Europe Does Not Stay in Europe

Haikus harvested using syllable-counting algorithms (or something) from text published in the New York Times.

    timeshaiku:

    A haiku from the article: With Banking, What Happens in Europe Does Not Stay in Europe

    Haikus harvested using syllable-counting algorithms (or something) from text published in the New York Times.

  6. Illustration by Lesley Barnes for George Orwell’s 1984. It’s featured in The Graphic Canon, Volume 3: ‘500 pages of classic 20th-century literature reimagined graphically by 70+ artists’, and ‘the most beautiful book of the year' according to Publishers Weekly.

    Illustration by Lesley Barnes for George Orwell’s 1984. It’s featured in The Graphic Canon, Volume 3: ‘500 pages of classic 20th-century literature reimagined graphically by 70+ artists’, and ‘the most beautiful book of the year' according to Publishers Weekly.

  7. A two-page spread illustration by Anthony Ventura for The Second Coming, the poem by W.B. Yeats. The illustration is part of the recently published The Graphic Canon, Volume 3: ‘500 pages of classic 20th-century literature reimagined graphically by 70+ artists,’ it’s ‘the most beautiful book of the year' according to Publishers Weekly, in a post about the book featuring more beautiful images, here.

Over the course of three huge volumes, more than 120 illustrators and comics artists had given their visual take on 181 classic works of literature, from ancient days to the end of the twentieth century.

    A two-page spread illustration by Anthony Ventura for The Second Coming, the poem by W.B. Yeats. The illustration is part of the recently published The Graphic Canon, Volume 3: ‘500 pages of classic 20th-century literature reimagined graphically by 70+ artists,’ it’s ‘the most beautiful book of the year' according to Publishers Weekly, in a post about the book featuring more beautiful images, here.

    Over the course of three huge volumes, more than 120 illustrators and comics artists had given their visual take on 181 classic works of literature, from ancient days to the end of the twentieth century.

  8. A flyer by the artist Renato Larini for Espaço Zebra, a speakeasy/gallery/furniture workshop where he lives and works in Bixiga, in the heart of São Paulo.

    A flyer by the artist Renato Larini for Espaço Zebra, a speakeasy/gallery/furniture workshop where he lives and works in Bixiga, in the heart of São Paulo.

  9. A Clean, Well-Lighted Place, by Paolo Di Lucente

These iconic images capture the true atmosphere of the classic New York diner. Read the full feature in Issue 01 of The Gourmand Journal.

    A Clean, Well-Lighted Place, by Paolo Di Lucente

    These iconic images capture the true atmosphere of the classic New York diner. Read the full feature in Issue 01 of The Gourmand Journal.

  10. Writing non-fiction – structure

    Lots of people can write beautiful prose, it’s structure that’s tricky. Novelists can afford to just start writing and see where it takes them, writers of non-fiction need to have a plan. Draw up a list of “landing places”, points in your narrative where your reader can have a bit of a sit down and admire the view so far. Your job as narrator is to lead them from one landing place to the next, neither chivvying them along nor allowing them to lag behind. Make sure, though, that you don’t come over like a drill sergeant. The trick of good narrative non-fiction is to allow the reader to feel that they have worked it all out for themselves.

    Some good advice by Kathryn Hughes, ‘director of UEA’s MA programme in biography and creative non-fiction’, in the Guardian's 'So you want to be a writer …

  11. Hypnotic re-edit of a couple dancing to a Brazilian song in the street in Ilheús, North-East Brazil, setting it to Radiohead’s ‘Lotus Flower’.

    by zuarage

  12. Icicle lights, via drawing-bored.

    Icicle lights, via drawing-bored.

  13. The night sky over São Paulo if we could see it, by photographer Thierry Cohen. He takes these pictures, from the series ‘Darkened Cities’, in the daytime, when there’s no lights on and seemingly nobody home. Then he darkens them and superimposes a night sky from somewhere where you really can see the stars – from a desert, or somewhere deserted. 
What this image reminds me of is the book ‘The World Without Us’, which imagines the world we have made if we just disappeared in an instant, vanished, no explanation needed. The book looks at what would happen next: which constructions would survive, exactly how things break down and grow back over, and with what velocity or lack of it. Immediately, in terms of the New York subway, which author Alan Weisman says would fill with seawater almost immediately. And never, in terms of all the plastic in the ocean, breaking down into smaller and smaller particles, killing smaller and smaller life-forms that ingested it, never going away …

    The night sky over São Paulo if we could see it, by photographer Thierry Cohen. He takes these pictures, from the series ‘Darkened Cities’, in the daytime, when there’s no lights on and seemingly nobody home. Then he darkens them and superimposes a night sky from somewhere where you really can see the stars – from a desert, or somewhere deserted. 

    What this image reminds me of is the book ‘The World Without Us’, which imagines the world we have made if we just disappeared in an instant, vanished, no explanation needed. The book looks at what would happen next: which constructions would survive, exactly how things break down and grow back over, and with what velocity or lack of it. Immediately, in terms of the New York subway, which author Alan Weisman says would fill with seawater almost immediately. And never, in terms of all the plastic in the ocean, breaking down into smaller and smaller particles, killing smaller and smaller life-forms that ingested it, never going away …

  14. Hey, Kool Thing, come here, sit down beside me.
    There’s something I gotta ask you. 
    I just wanna know, what are you gonna do for me?
    I mean, are you gonna liberate us girls 
    From male white corporate oppression?

    via supermanandsupermodels